Fine Art Landscape and Travel Photography

 

Fine Art Landscape and Travel Photography

 

Lesson Info

Photographing People

This is where we talked a little bit before, when you go and you take your travel photographs, one thing that you should do is go for those iconic photographs, those photos that are really important, that say everything that needs to be said about the photo in one, yeah, the hero shots. The other thing that you need to do is to take lots and lots of photographs of little incidental things so that you can build up that story that you were talking about. Perfect for books and things like that. That's right so when we come back from a trip, I try to get photographs on my iPhone and I figure that 12 to 20 is probably the maximum that people are ever going to look at. But it allows you to tell a story so that can be everything, a whole range of things. Hopefully one or two iconic photos will be in there as well. So this image which is in Spain, it's an iconic location and it's a strong photograph. I think this for you as well, in Iceland. Same thing, just a black, barren, well the pie...

ce is barren but there's elements of life. So that green has been popped out, it's very very very vibrant. Sometimes those iconic photos or those important photographs are going to be of people. So when we come to photographing people, there are a number of approaches here. Some people say it should only be candid, you shouldn't interact with the person to get a real photo. Other people say no I'm happy to talk to them, interact with them, go on and take your photo, click. I don't care, I think whatever it takes to get the photograph, that works. I think it's important though, that we have the trust of the people. I don't have a problem with paying if that's necessary because if they're stopping and it's a country which is basically very poor, I think it's the least I can do. And possibly though better than giving kids money, is to share gifts and like little toys and stuff like that. This lady is a lady in a point of question where just quickly I put my camera up to photograph her looking like this and as soon as my camera went up, her hands went down. Now, I'd just arrived in Bhutan and I was told that you wouldn't have to pay to take photos and I didn't. Perhaps I shouldn't. So I thought well, what's going on, so up down up down. So I went over to, we were in a temple, there's a donation box and I put a lot of money in the donation box and I shouldn't say a lot, I put some money in the donation box, and went back, her hands went down. So I thought, oh would you like some money? Oh okay. Hands stayed there, she stayed there as long as I'd liked to get that photograph, there was no trouble. So to me, to exchange of a little bit of money for her portrait was fantastic and I really like the shot. But that was the only person I've ever paid for a photograph in Bhutan so that's it. This is the same gentleman we saw before from behind, and this is the other side. He was actually someone who's in charge of a tourist destination and he got dressed up. Took advantage of that, didn't I. But probably loses a bit of the mystique now that I've told you that. There's only the four of them now. Two little kids on the side of the road shot with a wide-angle, again just someone who came up to see us. We were on a tour and I said ah can we take your photograph. Oh yeah I'll get my friend, let's do it. This lady here was the happiest lady and the oldest lady in the nunnery and I just said oh would you just mind showing me your jumping around. And look at the Crocs she's got on her feet, yeah the shoes. Just wonderful. Here we come back to the monk. Again, having him look almost floating in the clouds is the idea that I had behind him. This young guy is a candid shot. That shot was a 50mm f1.4 lens, one of the secrets, I think, of great portrait shots in travel is the 50mm f1.2, f1.4, or the 85mm f1.2 f1.4 or even 1.8. That wide aperture throws everything behind and everything in front, like the grate that's in front of this guy, this musician, out of focus and just keeps the focus on the eyes. And so that shallow depth of field to me, is a real keeper, something I learnt from the portrait photographers. Same sort of thing here, I'm limiting my depth of field. Just shallow depth of field and then the other guys are behind. I love the guy on the left, that looks like you Turney, always frowning at me.

Class Description

Using aerial views for landscape photography adds a distinguishing flare to your portfolio. But how do you create images that stand out in an industry flooded with beautiful imagery? World-renowned landscape and aerial photographers Peter Eastway and Tony Hewitt are going to show you how to create a stand-out portfolio using the techniques they’ve developed throughout their award-winning careers. In their class, you will learn:

  • How they incorporate aerial shooting into their landscape imagery
  • The importance of post production using Adobe® Lightroom®, Photoshop® and Capture One softwares
  • How to incorporate your ideas and emotions into your landscape photography
  • What equipment to use to capture your best images
  • How to put together a strong, unique portfolio

This is a unique opportunity to learn from two photography masters as they share their industry specific expertise.