Fashion Design: Start to Finish

Lesson 4 of 47

Fashion Inspiration Resources

 

Fashion Design: Start to Finish

Lesson 4 of 47

Fashion Inspiration Resources

 

Lesson Info

Fashion Inspiration Resources

Addition to the mood board, you want to start to build a resource for yourself and one of the foundations for that is a good fashion library. I I really recommend that you find the books that speak to you, some of them and also think about the fact that fashion books are not always necessarily just beautiful coffee table books because often that's a category that that's great that we definitely want to collect but find I go through fashion books and it's a huge temptation, you know, to buy every fashion book out there, but you need to kind of again narrow your focus a little bit and sort of see what speaks to you when you go through that book. Is there a lot there and answering those questions about the mood board, like, explore that book with more than more than just the pretty pictures like say to yourself, would I go back to this on a regular basis and then of course, there the books that you just get because they're beautiful and you want to own them? Um, fashion media is another g...

reat resource on dh remember that includes magazines, video, digital so for magazines often if you start collecting magazines that could take up a lot of space, so you might want to think in terms of files for tear sheets for magazines, so once that magazine is no longer relevant for you you want to just pull the things that are that you want to hold on to um I mean I have I actually have resource file is dating back to the eighties when I was studying fashion for the first time just because those images really still speak to me and it's a good thing to go back into them and you know and edit a little bit what you know what? What uh no longer is relevant for you and then for video the probably one of the greatest resource is for more design where designers today is the ability to see complete fashion shows online to really see an entire show. So if a designer's having a show online you know the marc jacobs shows happening online you're not being it's not being edited for you by an editor you know it's not just what anna winter decides to put in vogue from the marc jacobs collection you can actually go online and see and see for yourself what you like because there may have been image, you know, selections edited out of the process that might be what you actually need to sort of get in touch with tearsheets mentioned earlier with magazines I have again huge files of tear sheets and notebooks, as I mentioned earlier to eyes this sort of mobile um mobile tool I'm on the train and I'll see a little detail on someone's jacket and I always have that little notebook with me to jot down that little notation on dh it makes a big difference because a lot of times we'll say oh, I'll remember and it'll just disappear, you know, there's just way too much ah, that idea is that we're collecting so notebooks I go back to on a regular basis and I go back to old books as well. I really love the idea j of watching those watching videos and shows online are there particular places that you go like some favorite spots where if people are new to this they can? Is it? Is it the particular designer that you're following that you see that they're going to do something online? Are these things live or are they will be recorded? I think the best strategy is to find tio follow designers that you really speak to and usually through social media you'll get notifications in terms of you know, like during fashion week the most designers air live streaming or those are those shows are putting online afterwards s so you want to uh not wait for it to come to you you really want teo be proactive and start connecting with those designers so that again it becomes thiss constant flow of all the things you love great, thank you so alright uh we mentioned the look being very important because this is an extension this is that person who's representing you, whether it be on the runway or in an editorial or even in your showroom you know, when you're selling, um or the actor you know, for a costume designer and hair is is very key because often we might think of this great hairstyle and it will interfere with the close one of the rules that I have in my sketching classes that you could have all the hair you want, but none of it could be on the clothes because a lot of times you know, our students will start to pull their hair into, you know, over their clothes and in a fashion sketch, you wanted to be about the fashion and the same is true for you no editorial and runway uh, makeup again, you can have a model completely transformed. I had a model once that I selected her sight unseen, but I had seen her picture, but I hadn't met her and she showed up to a shoot and I don't know who she wass and she you know, the pictures that I saw her were incredibly sophisticated and she when she showed up, she looked like she was twelve and she looked nothing like the picture, and when she came out of makeup, she was back you know, me, so make up completely transformed her and that's one of the great things about it, but you have to have an idea of what kind of direction you want to give to your makeup teams and the same thing with hair I again one show, uh, didn't think about the hair, gave it over to the hair stylist, and the models came out with twigs in their hair, and it was great, but it had nothing to do with my collection, so I think about, you know, having some direction, you want to give makeup and hair people and stylist all the freedom, but you also want to provide a little direction, and this is all information that you start to collect again for your mood board or your notebooks and accessories, same thing we talked about the little black dress earlier, and this becomes a way of reinforcing whatever the messages are in your mood board, and these are just some examples of very dramatic hair. These air from boston fashion week uh, how do you kind of edit when you're going down, like styling and accessorizing? Because I I've seen it done, obviously with a lot of like big name runway shows like there's people, they get very orn e and kind of like over the top, and sometimes I'm like fire to do that I would think it would be too much and that I would need to scale back like you can't have like all dark makeup in a lot of accessories and a lot of high neck stuff so like how do you do you ever feel like well, keep in mind like once you have these thes great collection of ideas you need to think who the intended viewer is so for fashion shows often we pushed the envelope when we think about the theater of it so we go full on you know we go heavy make up a big accessories that kind of thing if you were designed I mean showing the same clothes in a showroom it would be without all that even if you have the model it would be all about the clothes because once it comes to a buyer or a customer they're going to be interpreting how they're going to wear that they might be inspired by what you put together but that's another thing that a designer has to do they kind of need to let go and realize that after they design it it might not be worn the same way afterwards you mentioned the sari like just adding a lot with like all the accessory wasn't yet thank you strategy you can have that strategy also like that speaks to you you know there's a school of thought that says maura's mohr and less is more so you have to ask yourself what what is my message about? Is it about this sort of ease and comfortable and not a lot of adornment or is it about excess because that could be a part of your strategy and your whole look so all right and here we have we're talking about perspectives and this these are these are the wild cards these are the things that can really open your eyes too different ways of looking at your work so the first one is stylist a lot of people I think that stylist just you know, make everything look clean and pretty but a lot of times they can put their splint on how they perceive your collection and designers can often be closed off to that they want to show it the way they want to show it but I really encourage designers to think about how do other people respond to their work. So how would you wear this? What would you do with it ideas that take unexpected turns? You know you're working on a design and thinking and you are to use the mood where is an example? You have the mood board and you see things start to go together that you would never have expected with colors, patterns even with your model happy accidents I've had things you know design something and all of a sudden you know store it, and something happens to it and it's just really cool. And I think, oh, I like what happened to it, you mean, or something? Terrors or just any kind of flukes, and you conf find, find some inspiration there. Maybe not for that collection. You may want to follow through on the original idea, but save some the things that you like, that happened, you know, sort of accidentally, and just the great unknown, like, you just never know what you don't know. So be open to listening and seeing and sort of getting a feel for things that aren't in your immediate, you know, concept.

Class Description

Interested in the world of fashion? Even if you're not an aspiring fashion designer, you’ll enjoy this class. Jay Calderin is the Director of Creative Marketing and an instructor at the School of Fashion Design. He is the author of three top-selling books on Fashion Design, and the founder and executive director of Boston Fashion Week. 


In Fashion Design: Start to Finish, Jay Calderin will get you started through hands-on demonstrations and step-by-step guidelines. 
Learn to navigate through the design process, from conceiving a garment to marketing it.

The various phases of fashion design will be covered, including:
  • research and mood boards, collections and trends
  • sketching, draping, pattern making, construction 
  • branding, marketing, and industry positioning
Fashion doesn’t have to be intimidating. This class is a beginners guide to the world of fashion design, led by an industry professional.

Reviews

Abbeylynne
 

Jay is a rare gem in the world of instructors. He has the perfect balance of information, examples, and hands on visuals. He included his students in the teaching process. They were not just the audience. Even the viewers were encouraged to participate! I loved his teaching style and enthusiasm as well as the content of information he shared with us. He covered a vast amount of information and led us at a pace that was very easy to follow. It reaffirmed my love of fashion as well as designing new ideas. This class was inspiring and motivating. If you are even the slightest bit curious about Fashion Design, constructing patterns, or even drawing models, this class is for you. It was all encompassing for an overview of Fashion Design from start to finish. Jay has an easygoing manner that you will want to watch him again and again. A great resource for your library. I can't wait to see him again in the Creative Live classroom!. Good luck to Jay and all his endeavors! Thank you Creative Live for providing yet another great learning opportunity for an international audience.

Michelle B
 

This is day one of Jays class and I am already hooked and purchased this class. Jay is an awesome instructor. He explains everything in easy to understand terms. He explained things that I have bought books to learn and didn't in one easy lesson. I recommend this class for anyone that has a interest in Fashion design or even learning to draw models for anything you need to sketch out. I hope Creative Live will bring Jay back for more classes. Jay is a instructor also worth having in your tool box of CL classes to refer back to for learning and inspiration! Thank You Jay for sharing your knowledge with us!!

Anji
 

I agree with everything that michelle-b said in her review of this class, and will add that I can tell that he is an instructor who not only knows his subject matter, but has excellent teaching skills. He is very engaged with his students, and focused on making sure that they get what he is telling/showing them. He also has the rare gift of distilling a complex subject down to its essence and teaching it in a simplified form that gives the student a good overview of the basics, and somehow also gives the student insight into more of the subject’s depth than he actually says in words. This broader understanding of the subject empowers the student to proceed on a much higher level than would be possible after taking any other course overview. Even more amazing is that the lessons covered in this way could be (and are) full courses in themselves elsewhere, but were merely segments of this two-day CL class. For this reason, if I ever got a chance to take one of Jay’s classes at the School of Fashion Design, I would take it in an instant. I too bought this class by the end of Day 1. For me, the segments on sketching and drafting alone were worth the $69, and the rest is bonus.