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Masters of Photography

Lesson 14 of 54

Picking the best shot

Albert Watson

Masters of Photography

Albert Watson

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Lesson Info

14. Picking the best shot
Albert discusses and shows you his techniques for selecting the best shot from a shoot.

Lessons

Class Trailer
1 Meet your Master 01:26 2 Learn from the journey 15:24 3 Using inspirations 08:43 4 Photography is stopping time 09:27 5 Albert's library of ideas 08:30 6 Tips on preparing for a portrait shoot 12:10 7 Setting up the studio 04:56 8 Understanding studio collaboration 07:35
9 The importance of casting and hair & make-up 08:59 10 Foreground studio set up 08:46 11 Studio session with a model - set up 1 11:23 12 Studio session with a model - set up 2 05:55 13 Studio session with a model - set up 3 08:01 14 Picking the best shot 03:36 15 Working with photoshop 13:14 16 Creating a portrait of Alfred Hitchcock 04:18 17 The gigantic question... Colour or black and white? 07:55 18 One day with Kate Moss 05:06 19 Learn to have your ideas ready 06:14 20 Using Polariods 06:29 21 Creating beautiful photographs of hands 04:45 22 Controlling natural light 05:38 23 Shooting a monkey with a gun 06:27 24 Choosing your format 07:13 25 Composition and lens 04:47 26 Shooting landscapes. The Isle of Skye 15:18 27 Planning and ideas for a landscape shoot 06:32 28 Creating still life images 13:48 29 Photographing the Lost Diary 10:53 30 Shooting album covers 03:09 31 The Strip Search Project 10:28 32 Shooting Las Vegas landscapes 08:24 33 Photographing Breaunna 07:21 34 Balancing daylight, God bless America 03:45 35 Creating the Maroc Project 10:21 36 Creating the Maroc shoot 08:11 37 Photographing sand dunes 04:09 38 Photographing Moroccan children 10:42 39 Advice on making portraits 10:12 40 How to be alert to finding photographs 07:36 41 Making a portrait of Mike Tyson 02:40 42 Creating intense colour in a photograph 03:05 43 Portraits of rap stars and a Golden Boy 08:40 44 Photographing Jack Nicholson 04:21 45 Creating a portrait of David Cronenberg 02:14 46 How to light only using two $10 bulbs 07:30 47 Studio fashion set up 4 10:48 48 Studio session with a model. The geography of a face 13:05 49 Look inside the picture 02:57 50 Creating memorability in an image 02:54 51 Combining nudes and landscapes 04:52 52 A perfect print 07:51 53 The business side of things 06:51 54 Conclusion and farewell 03:55

Lesson Info

Picking the best shot

(melancholy piano music) So the editing process is of course supreme importance. Because you can take 200 shots of one particular image. You've got to find out what's the best choice. I'm doing it in a very straightforward way. I look at the first collection of images, maybe four or five or six that I did. And then I go to the very end of the shoot and I have a look at four or five six at the end. But the important part of the process here is I pick maybe the best one of my first four and best one of my last four. Okay? And I put them side by side. And those are markers that you put up. So basically it becomes a competition between the two images that you have up there. From the beginning of the shoot and the end. And you then begin to analyze as you go through all of the shots, you're looking for shots here that beat these two shots here. So it's a process of, if you do find a shot that beats 'em, then you basically take down the one that beats it and substitute them. So it's a proc...

ess of elimination. But it's very important that you have a marker. Rather than just keep going through stuff. It's important that you have a marker. So for example here. I went through them and I said well this isn't bad here. 'Cause these are raw files here. So you say this isn't bad here. I think this has possibilities. And you check it for sharpness and go in closer and just see what details are in it. And then you basically move it over into Photoshop and then you work on it a little bit. And you end up here. With this shot here. But it's a process of elimination. Now there's another thing that you can do. If it's a very important shoot to you. One thing you can do is you can edit down to your best two or three images from that particular shot. And you can look at them and live with them for a while. Now sometimes you don't have the luxury of that. You say well I'll put it up on Monday. I'll still look at it until Friday. Sometimes you don't have that luxury to do. Very often I'll take three images if it's a very important shoot maybe for a gallery or a museum. And you put them on the wall and you really live with them for a week or two. And you see what you love about them and what you don't love about them. What you feel has permanency. But what I'm looking for, this is a key factor for me. I'm looking for memorability. That the shot is memorable. And is the shot charismatic. Now you can bring in maybe someone else's opinion that you trust. But in the end I'm afraid that the onus is on you to make your selection. Not whether it's your wife or your girlfriend or another photographer friend. I'm afraid it has to eventually fall to you. And it has to be your choice and that you're comfortable with. There shouldn't be oh I quite like that you don't like it. There has to be an absolute decision made by you as a photographer to find the best shot that you took. And it's an important decision. It can take time. But remember one thing. Maybe the importance can be also spontaneous. In other words something that grabs you right away has a value. So it grabs you right away and hopefully the following day it grabs you. And a week later and a month later and so on it still grabs you. It's really a competition to find the best shot. You're in a competition with yourself to find the best shot.

Class Description



IN THIS CLASS YOU'LL LEARN:

  • Albert’s tips and tricks on landscape, fashion, portraiture and still life photography.
  • Simple lighting techniques using natural light and studio light
  • Simple tips on preparing for portrait shoots
  • How to create incredible portraits using just two $10 bulbs
  • Albert’s tips and tricks on landscape, fashion, portraiture and still life photography.
  • Simple lighting techniques using natural light and studio light
  • Simple tips on preparing for portrait shoots
  • How to create incredible portraits using just two $10 bulbs


ABOUT ALBERT’S CLASS:

Learn how Albert creates his amazing photographs on location and in the studio using simple explanations.

Albert reveals his shoot secrets on how he photographs Presidents, Hollywood stars, music’s greatest artists, landscapes, nudes, chimpanzees and still life. We follow him on location in Morocco, Paris and in his studio in New York. You will find out where he suggests you look to get inspiration, how to approach a portrait session, see how to light like Albert.

We show you exactly how Albert works on these images after the shoot, it’s all about Albert giving you his ideas and advice and helping you see and create better images for yourself.

It’s not about what camera to use, it’s about how to see and develop ideas, concepts and narrative to make stunning photographs.

As Albert says..."You have to stay switched on"

Reviews

Richard A. Heckler
 

"Unless you're Mozart"...this course is an invaluable asset. I'm a pro, humanitarian/documentary photographer, & wilderness...and I've learned much from the 40+ sessions here. This is truly a Master Class...next best thing to being with Albert. And although I could watch studio sessions forever, this course offered a very balanced curriculum of technical information, artistic encouragement and guidance, and a open, generous window into the thinking of a gifted artist and photographer, sifted from decades of first class experience. Kudos to all involved. Excellent!

a Creativelive Student
 

I purchased my first CreativeLive class in 2011 and have continued to purchase many classes over the years. I have learned so much from the many great instructors. This one is not a technical class that will tell you to set your camera at f4, 1/60, ISO 400 and you can get this shot. If you are looking for that, there are many other options. If you have a solid working knowledge of photography, this class is so much more. The way it was filmed is like you are there with him in conversation or in the room with him watching him shoot. To see and understand the how and why he does what he does. Not to take anything away from other classes that have helped to give me a strong understanding of photography, this is my favorite CreativeLive class so far.