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Partnerships and Brand Strategy

Lesson 63 from: The Outdoor Enthusiast's Guide to Photography & Motion

Ian Shive

Partnerships and Brand Strategy

Lesson 63 from: The Outdoor Enthusiast's Guide to Photography & Motion

Ian Shive

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Lesson Info

63. Partnerships and Brand Strategy

Lessons

Class Trailer
1

Bootcamp Introduction

06:35
2

Storytelling with Stills and Motion Overview

14:35
3

Elements of a Well-told Story

22:12
4

Storytelling in Motion

34:19
5

Choosing the Best Gear for Your Outdoor Project

16:24
6

Gear for Drones

02:53
7

Gear for Motion

05:23
8

Inside Ian's Gear Bag

20:07
9

General Advice for Preparation

14:19
10

Virtual Scouting

03:54
11

Weather

10:17
12

Permits and Permission

03:09
13

Model and Property Releases

04:43
14

Health and Fitness

03:04
15

Checklist

03:20
16

Location Scouting Overview

15:18
17

Location Scouting in the North Cascades

15:24
18

Drone Introduction

14:59
19

Drone Safety

03:26
20

What Kind of Drone Should I Buy?

02:58
21

FAA Part 107 Test: How to Prepare

06:18
22

Telling a Story With a Drone

06:15
23

Drone Camera, Lenses and Movements

04:34
24

Selling Drone Footage

02:39
25

Why Does a Photographer Need Motion?

10:59
26

Establish the End User

06:35
27

Identify Your Audience

03:12
28

Build a Production Plan

05:28
29

Create the Story Structure

04:26
30

The Shooting Script

07:08
31

Production Quality

08:37
32

Composition for Stills

08:04
33

Composition for Stills: Landscape

08:15
34

Composition for Stills: Telephoto Lens

14:48
35

Composition for Stills: Macro Lens

07:50
36

Techniques for Capturing Motion in the Field

25:15
37

Lenses and Filters for Outdoor Photography

26:20
38

Capturing Landscapes - Part 1

28:12
39

Capturing Landscapes - Part 2

23:36
40

Capturing Movement in Stills

32:17
41

Shooting Water, Sky and Panorama

29:40
42

Understanding Stock

20:45
43

Editorial vs Commerical

03:57
44

Pricing Stock

05:40
45

Producing Stock

14:49
46

Shooting for Social Media vs Stock

11:37
47

Choosing an Agency

08:58
48

Assignments and Capturing Stock

13:49
49

Stock Photography Market

05:28
50

Create A Style Guide

05:30
51

Stock Shoot Analysis

21:29
52

Workflow for Selecting Final Stills

27:43
53

Initial Editing in Adobe Bridge

21:02
54

Reviewing and Selecting Motion Footage

11:02
55

Keeping Track of Your Story Ideas

22:40
56

Script and Story Structure Evolution

04:34
57

Editing to the Content

05:00
58

Music as a Character

05:41
59

Business Diversification

07:07
60

Business Strategy

04:57
61

Pillars of Revenue

17:09
62

Branding

06:36
63

Partnerships and Brand Strategy

05:12
64

Galleries and Fine Art

03:11
65

Budgeting

05:21
66

The Future of Photography

26:12
67

Q&A And Critique

1:09:39

Lesson Info

Partnerships and Brand Strategy

brand is important partnerships and brand strategy to go back to that point. Who do you partner with? You know, I've always liked the idea of, like, finding companies that are like minded. I think about tandem, I think, like, oh, maybe a bicycle company, right? Or, you know, we're an outdoor company, so maybe we can work with other outdoor companies. What other things are fun to do outdoors. And But how can you be? How can you go past that? Right. Partnerships are very important. I've talked a little bit about him, so not gonna overly dwell on it, but figure out who to partner with is gonna be important to you. Um, you know, you wanna have maybe one partner, so we like as a company, we partner with the gallery. Maybe is an individual photographer you partner with other photographers or some kind of community organization or an educational outlet or something like that? But either way, they should help build your visibility, and you should offer something to them. And that leads me to c...

rafting your proposal. So if you say, hey, I want to work with you, let's say let's think of something off the cuff. What would be an off the cuff kind of company? What could we think of? Well, they're really big already. I was very big What think of like would think of it rather than a specific companies like a genre. But, uh, what a beer. A beer company? Okay, talk about them. Alcoholic beverages have their own set of rules. But if you're gonna crash proposal, what's called it? What's called a soft drink company? How about that? What can you offer them? What's the first thing you have to offer them in your proposal of why they should promote you and make your business more visible to their audience? What's the number one thing everyone in this room has that they can offer photography? Exactly. Your greatest leverage is gonna be a photography member. Those prices I showed you on licensing that's your value. You have a numeric value assigned to what it is that you can offer somebody that's your first step of leverage. What you might ask. Well, why would I give it to them for free when maybe they want to pay for it? Well, you have to make the call on whether you want that partnership and their visibility and their marketability or not Now, a lot of people. Now, this is a trick to because you want to do this, right? So you wouldn't do this with a magazine where you say, Hey, I want your visibility. Unless you're giving you a full page ad or writing a profile on your anybody writes a profile in May, maybe includes a bio headshot linked to your elonis s a whole bunch of nice things about you. I'll give them a zoom, any photos they want for free for that article and help build that out. But I'm not gonna let that have my photo for free because my by line, which is, you know, minuscule and sideways on the inside of the of the magazine. None of them have that for free, cause that's not visibility. That's on a partnership that's not marketing. So you have Teoh qualify the partnership first, but you have value. And so I think that it's important to think about, um what that value is and how much you want to say. If you say this soft drink company but say it's a local one, right? They make like a local root beer. I don't know, making this stuff up as I go, they make a local root beer and it's in, um, Michigan Sleeping bear dunes. Like a talk in the other class. All these really colorful, like bright images and say, Hey, you know, these images normally would go for $400 each for you to use them on your website and social media. I'll let you guys use my images for a year up to 10 images. If in exchange you'll link to my website where I sell my books and my fine art prints. Well, if you know that they have enough traffic, you're now going to help get some of that traffic, and you're gonna say, I'm saving you $4000. It doesn't actually mean sure cost you something to produce the work. But it's not taking money out of your pocket to buy ads or by space to get that. So that's the leverage that you're gonna try and figure out. That's a good example of how to do it. It doesn't need to be on a national level. You mentioned, you know, like a big company. I think that would be very challenging. You spend a lot of time trying to get there, and they're not going to necessarily see the value in it. They may or may not. But chances are they've already got a budget for stock photography and whatever else and original content and shoots and a whole bunch of other criteria that you're not gonna have less leverage there because they've already kind of got it figured out another place that might work. I know people who do work with these kinds of companies, so, like the soft drink company or a beer company is an example. That's real world. I know somebody who does that where they say I'll actually go out and shoot something for you two days once a year in exchange for promotions of partnerships and visibility and you know whatever else they need, Um, it works really well. It works really, really well for them, and a lot of times they do. Those two days shoots and they offer them five images and the company comes back and says I want five more and I'm willing to pay for it and now you actually get paid for that, too. So so that's just a little bit about partnerships and branch. I just would make sure that what who you partner with is aligned with who you are in your philosophy. Right. Um, so I'm not gonna go out and start partnering with, you know, a fracking company or something like that, right?

Class Materials

Bonus Materials with Purchase

Slides

Ratings and Reviews

monica4
 

Ian was an amazing instructor.; very fun, enthusiastic, encouraging, and comprehensive. I hope to be able to return as an audience member for another of his classes. It is a privilege and a gift to have access via Creative Live to such a wealth of expertise. Thank you!

Cindee Still
 

Ian Shive is a dynamic speaker with a wealth of knowledge he is willing to share. He has had a magical path that led to his success. He touches on so many aspects of making, selling and creating images as well as how to market them and make an income from your work. It is so much fun to be part of the studio audience. The Creative Live staff are always so warm and friendly and they feed you like your on a cruise ship! Wonderful experience.

Cindy
 

What a great class this has been. Thank you Ian Shive and Creative Live! Recently retired, I have set out to learn everything I can about photography and pursue this passion to capture the beauty in the outdoors. Creative Live has served as an amazing educational platform to help me learn everything from how to use my camera, the fundamental technicals, and learn about software and tools. This class brought it all together. At the end of this class my approach to photography and my images are different. Ian shares so much valuable knowledge that will change the way you go about taking a picture; from scouting a location, to thinking through the story and adding elements to an image to evoke an emotional response. My personal growth has been significant and I have changed to the way I approach creating an image from an Outdoor Landscape to an Outdoor Experience. Loved every minute of it, sad the class is over.

Student Work