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Creative Cloud Essentials

Lesson 5 of 42

Lightroom Color Corrections

 

Creative Cloud Essentials

Lesson 5 of 42

Lightroom Color Corrections

 

Lesson Info

Lightroom Color Corrections

So here we are, back in light room, and we decided earlier that it is the easiest place to do the kind of global color correction that we're about to do. So here we've got Uncle George, and the first thing that I'm gonna do is I'm gonna revert the image to its ugly original. So we're in the develop module and you get there simply by clicking the develop module up here, the top of the light room interface or by pressing the D key D for developed. And the sooner you get into the habit of using these keyboard shortcuts like that, the easier your life is going to be. You'll save a little bit of time there. Okay, so it's come down to the bottom of the develop module panels and let's go ahead and click Reset, and we'll get back to the ugly, ugly original. Now, let's take a look at how easy it is to correct your images in light room. We're gonna start up here in the basic panel, so I'm gonna click to expand the basic panel. I am in solo mode. So when I click that flippy triangle, all the rest...

of the panels close up automatically. So what we've got here are a range of sliders that we can use to correct our image, and nothing is easier to use And sliders. I mean, it's sliders, right? It's so simple. The first thing I like to do is I like to correct the white balance, and that's basically it is telling lighter and up what the color of light should be in your image, maybe a little bit different than what it was in camera. If you're shooting under fluorescence like I was, I got this nasty yellow cast, so I want to get rid of that so often times when you use the when you change the white balance, you may not need to correct the image much further. That may really bring the colors back in line. So what we're gonna do is grab the white balance tool some of the click it, and now when I mouse over to my image, I get this nice little eyedropper, and it's a lot bigger than the one in photo shops. You can actually see it here in light room, which is different. This bite balance tool works kind of like the spray can paint can rather in that Once you pick it up, you can put it back into its little slot if you want to you. So we're going to come over here and I'm gonna click an area. I'm gonna zoom in my pressing my space bar and actually, I'm on the zoom in and move around. So when you don't have the white balance tool activated, then you can cruise around within your image because your cursor turns into a little grabby hand. OK, But you can't do that wants the white balance tools activated. So we're gonna go ahead and give it a click. And what we can do is a couple different things. Click on an area in your image that really should be white If you want the closest thing to a white we've got in this particular images Uncle George's teeth. So we're gonna go ahead and give that a click. Now, what I like to do is I like to try to find in neutral so you can do it a couple different ways. You can either click what supposed to be white in the image or was supposed to be black or its with speaker. Or you can find a neutral, which is really just a pixel that has similar values in all three color channels. So as I mouse around on this image, you can see how the numbers at the bottom of that little panel are changing. Sometimes you can get better results if you click a pixel that has really similar values, so that would be in neutral. So let's say if all of these values down here at the bottom were near 63 it's unlikely that you'll find a pixel that has that is an exact neutral. In other words, the red value be 63 the green value be 63 the blue value be 63. But often times it works out better if you find a pixel that that has similar numbers, you know? So all in the lower sixties, for example, are all in the high seventies, you know, not too far apart. But for this one is gonna work out pretty well if we just tell light room, what really should be white in the image. So as soon as we click now, I'll press the space partisan back out you can see that we have indeed changed the color of lining in our image, but now it's a little bit too blue. So a couple of things you could do at this point you could come over here on the right hand side and change the temperature intent of the color of light in your image. Or you could just keep clicking until you find something else that works better. So I have a feeling if I click somewhere down here over the this little area of his shirt, I can get these numbers fairly close, and it'll take a little bit of experimentation to do that. Also, even one more time. Maybe there's a gray appear on his beard. So see how now, at the bottom of this panel, all of my numbers are fairly close together in the fifties, right? 55 53 57. So I give that a click. Now you can tell the color in my image, changed a little bit, warmed it up just a little bit, and that looks a little bit better to my eye. Remember that this is all subjective. There is no right or wrong when you're correcting your images. You want to correct it until it looks good to you, or more accurately, until looks good to your client. Right? So let's say this is good, so I'll come over here and put my tool away. If you don't wanna have to worry about putting your white balance tool a way, you could come down here and turn on the auto Dismiss check box underneath the image preview. If you turn that on as soon as you click on the tool puts itself away. I tend to roll with that off because I like the ability to keep clicking until I find a white balance that looks good to me. So that's why I leave that off. But you can turn it on if you're really good with this stuff. So we'll come back up here and try to find a pixel that's fairly closely. We've got 64 62 67. That's pretty close, and that gives me the color shift, but I've still got some warm tones. They're in the image, so now go ahead and put the tool away. Press the space bar so that can see the whole image. And now I want to find tune that white balance. So let's come over here to the temperature slider. It's a little bit too cool for me to cool, meaning a little bit too blue, so we're going to click and drag that temperature slider to the right. How far until it looks good to me as the shooter or to my client? You confined in that even further with a tent, slider and light room is a so user friendly because look at the sliders themselves. They indicate what's gonna happen depending upon the direction in which you drag the slider. So for the temperature slider, see how it's blue on the left and and can a golden on the right end? Well, if you want it warmer to introduce more yellow or orange tones like the sun, then you would drag it to the right. I want to cool it off like water or ice that I want to drag it to the left towards the blue in Well, the tent slider has the same kind of color going on, so if I drag it to the left, I'm gonna introduce a little bit more green. See how the image is changing. If I drag it to the right, I'm going away from green and I'm introducing a little bit of magenta, So just look at the sliders. If you can't remember what they do, then just take a good peek at them and look at the slider bar itself. It gives you hints as to what's gonna happen should you dragon in one direction over the other same thing down here. So I love the adobe. Put these tools in the order in which it's advantageous for you to use them. So start with the white balance. Oftentimes that may be all you need, or it will make you have less work to do down here in these other these other areas. Museum back out a little bit now, rather than setting the white balance manually, I could trot through the menu of different white balances presets, rather. So if I click this little custom in you right here and it changed a custom the minute I use the white balance tool, I just find that rarely, at least with my own photography, can I just pick one of these presets and it looked good. I typically need to set it manually for me to be pleased with it, so I tend to do that first. But that doesn't mean it'll work that way for you. So you can flip through all these different presets and and find the one that looks best to you as shot would be what your white balance was set in camera. Now it's it's important to mention that you can change the white balance. Using is presets only on images you shot in the raw format. You can do a custom white balance Sisters what we did with the white balance tool on J. Pegs as well. So it just depends on what you're shooting. If you shoot J pegs, which means your images kind of has some changes baked in from the camera itself. There's a little bit of saturation boost, a little noise reduction, a little sharpening going on in camera when you shoot JPEG when you shoot raw, there is nothing going on in camera other than capturing the information. So with raw images, we have access to this white balance preset mini with J pegs. You won't, so don't let that throw you when you're doing this on your own But you can still use the white balance tool to set a custom white balance on a J peg, which is what I would do so we can come down here and the next set of controls that we see our exposure and contrast, and they are listed in the order in which Adobe thinks you should use them. However, I've never met a light room policeman, so he's not going to show up on your doorstep, if you say happened to boost vibrance before you fix exposure. But generally it does work out better to go in order, but you can do whatever you want, so what we're going to do now is adjust the exposure. But before I just the exposure, I want to turn on a couple of warnings called clipping warnings. Clipping you may have heard as term thrown around in photographic circles is that if you do a correction on your image and you push the lightest bits of the image to pure white, so if I do something that pushes my highlights to be pure white, that's called clipping. Because when you do that, when you push your highlights to pure, why are you push your your shadows to pure black. You've effectively stripped those areas of detail because there's no detail in pure why import pure black is just water black. So light room has some warnings that you can turn on. And I like to keep him on because as I'm changing these sliders in this panel right here, I can see it immediately when I go too far and I start pushing my highlights or my shadows too far. So that's called clipping. So to turn those on, we're gonna press the J key J for Internet. Have to help me out on that one j for Just don't clip. I wish it was. See, see, see what makes it anyway? So as soon as I pushed J, I'll zoom in just a little bit. So you can see. Then I've got this little white stroke that appears around these triangles atop my hissed a gram. You don't see your history. Um, go ahead and clip, it's click. It's flippy triangle to expand it. And if I do push, my highlights were shadows too far. Then I'm gonna get these big red warning areas. My highlights. I'm gonna get a red warning and my shadows, like, get a blue warning if I go too far. So you just want to turn those on while you're messing around here in this basic panel to change your exposure settings? Sotzing back out. So I'm gonna go ahead and grab the exposure. Spider exposure really does changes the overall image brightness drag it left to darken. See those blue areas? Those are the areas of shadow that I've clipped. So I've pushed those areas to pure black, arguably not what we want to do for this photo you cannot see into pure black. If I drive the exposure slider to their right, I'm brightening the whole image. If I go too far, I will begin clipping my highlights in those warnings show up in red, so it's handy to keep these on. You do have the same exact warnings and camera raw except for the keyboard. Shortcuts over there actually makes sense for the shadow warning issue for under exposed through the highlight warning is oh, for overexposed. But in light room is J. So keeping those warnings on while you're adjusting your image is handy. I tend to worry more about blown out highlights. Then I d plugged up shadows because typically at the kind of photography that I do, I don't have a lot of detail in my shadows anyway, So I'm not gonna freak out if I pushed them my shadows to pure black. But I will freak out if I push my highlights to pure white. So that's what that does for. So for this particular image, I might brighten just a touch. And then the next control down is contrast. That's just gonna have light room. Look for areas of contrast. So where a light picks will meet the dark pixel as you drag the contrast slider to the right, those light pixels become a little lighter in the dark. Pixels become a little darker as you drag it to the left. That not only doesn't image that like crap, but the light pixels may become a little darker in the dark. Pixels become a little lighter, so you get this washed out looking situation. So I tend to always pump up the contrast a little bit on my images, which would be a great opportunity for a import preset. So things that you find once you start using light room and you will, because you gonna buy this course and you're gonna fall in love with it like I did then keep either mental note or maybe a little note pad. You know, actual pan and paper next to your desk. And when you find yourself doing things repeatedly in light room, that's a great opportunity for a preset. And it's just so easy to create presets in light room. And then you can choose to apply the preset here in the develop module or when you import your pictures, depending upon what you want to do, and you'd have as many presets as you want. I could have a preset that bumps up contrast that I apply on import. Then I might have another preset that I apply here in the develop module, depending upon what I want to do to that particular image. Very, very versatile. So the next slider down is highlights, and this is what's so amazingly powerful it is difficult to get to this stuff in photo shop. There is a shadows and highlight, uh, command, but it's not is easy to use. Is this one right here? So what we can do is, let's say, are we needed a lighten up our highlights that I dragged my highlight slider to the right and my highlights get lighter, my shadows air untouched, completely untouched. So if I want to darken my highlights, let's say I've got a slightly overexposed sky then that be a prime opportunity for you to grab this highlight slider and drag it to the left. And how do I know which direction to drag again? The slider self tells me. See how the slider on the left, the slider color is darker in its lighter on the right. So that's what, like rooms trying to tell you with the colors of those sliders there. So we've got the same kind of control on our shadows here. Let's say I want to open up my shadows. I wanna lighten them a little bit, but I don't want to touch my highlights. Then we grab the shadows slider, and we drag it to the right. See how those shadows have just opened up. I didn't know he had. I'm some nice tooling done on that bill. I couldn't see it before, but I can see it now, so the light in your shadows. Drive the cider to the right to dark in the shadows, drag the slider to the left. You know, we could create different moods in our photography with this kind of thing. If it any point you want to reset one of these sliders back to the default value, just double click the tag itself. For the label of that slider, double click it in camera raw, which is really for those of you who have been using camera Raw camera Raw is, ah, plug in that is installed alongside a photo shop, and if you double click a raw image to open it, the camera raw plug in will automatically open. It's really a converter, converts the raw negative file into you something that Photoshopped can use, and this is really the camera. Raw light rooms develop module is camera raw. It's the exact same set of sliders. They work in the exact same way. So if you're used to using Kameron Oh, we've got one nice gentleman in our studio audience that uses but a shop in bridge in camera, raw for his corrections, these sliders working exactly the same way, but over in camera raw to reset a slider to zero, You double click the slider itself instead of the label. How do you remember that? Well, if clicking one doesn't work, click the other. Either the label or the cider itself Is that simple? OK, so we got our highlights and our shadows here. One neat little trick for you. If you have no idea what to do with these or if you don't. If you're not really sure if your image needs it and you're feeling like, well, there, there I may as well move the slider to do something with it. One anything to even out the lighting in your image is to set them at the same amounts, but at negative values. OK, so for example, sometimes I like to sit my highlights to in my shadows to negative 25 or the reverse oftentimes on on an image that will be all you need to even out the lighting. So make one of them a negative. One of them a positive, used the same numbers, and that kind of gives you a little bit of even lighting in the image. So sometimes I do that, and that would be another opportunity for a preset right there. Just that one thing to keep you from having to go over there and change those sliders or or double click the field like I did to be able to enter a number So that be another possibility for a preset, These next sliders down here, the whites and the blacks, they really let you control some of the clipping that's going on. So let's say I did introduce Oh, Cem, some clipping in the shadows. I'll have to go real far down here to try that. Then I could come down here to my blacks. It's really resetting the white in the Black point is all these two sliders do right here with the sliders, you comptel photo shop or light room? Rather, what really should be white in your image or what really should be black. So if I had pushed my changes so far that I introduced clipping in the shadows, I could come over here to the black slider and by looking at the slider itself, it's darker on the left and lighter on the right. I could lighten my blacks to get rid of that clipping morning So that's another way that you can kind of manage some of the clipping that you might introduce while you're correcting your image. And again I can reset it to the default value by double clicking the label itself. I do know some people let me go ahead and change my exposure back to what it was originally. I do know some people that, like Teoh, hold down a modifier key while they're using the whites and blacks Sliders, Teoh just kind of see if it makes a difference in your image. So the modifier key is option on a Mac or Ault on a PC, so option they're all. And as I click the white slider, my whole image goes black. As I dragged that slider to the right, I will eventually start to see some color. Come in those air, my lightest values, the first pixels that start to come in. You can see him there in the middle. There, there little neon green, which is really like cream, showing you what channel those pixels really live in. So what some folks do is they press and hold option or all, and they drag the white slider to the right to the point at which they first start to see some pixels come in. And then that's really resetting the white point. They could do the same thing on the blacks. So if I option or all to click the blacks, my screen goes white instead of black. As I drag this slider to the lift, the first areas that come in you, no matter what color, son there is showing at yellow, which just means they're actually yellow. Um, as soon as you start to see pixels come in, then you could release that modifier key. And that's resetting your blacks. So, you know, light room has in its mind what it thinks, why it should be and what it thinks black should be. But you have full control over that, so I don't typically use those spiders in that way. But I know a lot of photographers who do so you might want to experiment with that. Typically, I will only attack these two sliders if I've got clipping going on. And I need to like, lighten my white, you know, till light room that I want to dark in my, my, uh, what it thinks why it is in order to dismiss that clipping morning. So just keep that in mind. You can use them in any way you want. But again, the modifier key is option on the Mac or all. It's on the PC, and if you want to use it to reset your white point or just to see where your lightest whites are, it's the areas of the image that first start to come in and color. I see. So that would be the middle parts right there of the image where those green specks are. And that's really where my lightest values are. So I could use a slider to tell light from that information. Same thing with the blacks option or all drag it to the left in the first areas that you start to see come in in any color are your darkest parts of the image. So if you wanted, you could tell light room. Hey, that's really what I want to be black is those dark areas right there, so it changes the color in your image just a little bit so you can use in that way if you want. Now, the next sliders down in the little presence area are my favorite clarity. Is this fantastic? But I typically don't use it on people pictures because clarity's really like an uncharged mask. You very used that photo shop. It is kind of like increasing contrast in the mid tones doesn't really mess with your lightest highlights or your darkest shadows, but it takes the pixel brightness levels that air in between and makes the light pixels lighter in the dark pixels. A little darter darker as if you were sharpening. So that's what clarity does. So as I drag clarity to the right, you can see that my I'm getting a lot more contrast in my image. But with skin tones, it's not a very happy thing because you'll make poor stand down. That's bad. But let me zoom in just a little bit and show you what happens with a negative clarity. So a press space far actually, that's a little bit too far. There we go. So if you do want to soften the image, clarity is a great way to do. If you click and drag clarity to the lift, see how soft my images giving and if I drag it all the way left, it almost looks like a painting, so sometimes I'll do a negative clarity value on portrait's just to kind of soften the scan a little bit. And any of the controls that you see here, thes changes can be painted onto specific parts of your image using light rooms. Adjustment brush. So maybe a negative clarity, like a negative tanner. Negative. 15. Paint that onto the skin. Tones of a portrait might be just the ticket for smoothing out and uneven complexion, perhaps, and also another great reason toe. Create a preset. So for this image, I might bump the clarity just a touch just to bring in a little extra contrast in the mid tones. But not very far, because I've got a lot of skin tones in here that I don't wanna. I don't want to accentuate. The next slider down is vibrance. I love this one, to vibrance tends to pump up the color intensity of colors that aren't already highly saturated. So for this image, it's not going to pay that much attention to Jorge's shirt because it's pretty highly saturated anyway with that color blue. But it is going to pump up the saturation, really, of the other colors that aren't already intense. So vibrance is a really neat one to do. I do that about, I increase it on just about every image that I shoot. I never use saturation saturation. I just can't stand because it just blows out everything. It intensifies all the colors, no matter what. But vibrance is a softer side of that. It looks for colors that aren't already highly saturated, and it only affects those. So that's a handy thing. And that's basically the adjustments there. So now press the space bar, Teoh, go back out. So let's take a peek at our before and after by pressing the Y key. So there's our before and there's our after. So let's say I'm happy with that. I do. You want to do one more thing. I want to show you how easy it is to add an edge vignette. A darkened, softly darkened edge, far easier to do in light room and in camera raw than it is in photo shop. So go ahead and press why to dismiss my before and after. And now it's cruise down in the panels on the right hand side and develop mode or module rather, and we want to go to the effects panel. Now. See, this is the great thing about having these panels in solo mode because as I click effects been the basic panel automatically collapsed. So down here in the effects panel, this is where I can do my my edge. Been getting so if I click and drive the amount slider to the right, I get a light and like a white edge and dragon as faras you want Now I've got clipping warnings turned on, but that's OK because I'm purposely adding a white board around the image, so I obviously don't care if I pushed that solid white. If you want a dark edge vignette, drag the slider to the left and that's it. And that those clipping warnings kind of get in your way after you've come out of the basic panel than this tap the J key to turn them off so they're when they're off. They don't have that little white outline around them, but when they're on, they do so pretty easy to tell when they're often on. All right, now, let me go find my image here there is. Okay, so now see how easy it is that that s been Yeah. I mean, in that crazy would turn off my clipping warnings again. You can also change the shape of the vignette, which the photographers will love because you'll live details like that so I can change the midpoint, which is really does changing the with 11. Yet click the label to reset that default value. I can also change the shape of the venue, and I'll make it a little bit more pronounced so you can see it as I click and drag the roundness slider to the lift. Now my vigna is more of, ah, rounded rectangle than it is an oval or in lips as I drag it to the right. Now it becomes more like a horizontal oval rather than a vertical mobile. So that's a really anything. You don't have that control in photo shop at all unless you get at camera raw from within photo shop. So has been getting hugely powerful here The feather amount how softly you want that has been yet to be so I drag it left. I can even give it a hearted if I wanted by Drag it right against softer, softer, softer, so infinite control over your vignettes here. And I do have in yet a soft one, not nearly that dark, but I'll do a soft one on any portrait that I do for a client. Actually, I give him the choice of tea, and they always pick the one with the Vigna. Always, always, always, never has that not happened. So that's a neat thing to do and because everything's nondestructive here in light room. So if you go over here to the history panel, I can see all the changes to the vignette. I did so even in my own experimentation, I can say, Oh, I like to the first vignette that I added so I could just click on that one right there, and it kind of turns off everything I did after that after that point. And if I want to go back to the last change in the vignette section that I made, I would just click that top entry there in the in the history panel. So really, really easy and say I can scroll all the way down this history panel, see everything I've ever done to this image. So if it any point, I don't like what I've done and I want to go back. Teoh. You know what? Previous? Uh, not really. Version of it, But a previous step. Then you just click that. Let's say I liked it before I added vibrance and saturation in the engine. Yet then I would just click the last clarity. That s so they're in order According to what you did, the last thing you do is going to show up at the top of the history panel. The earliest thing you do is gonna show up all the way at the bottom. So that's really, really handy, really very handy. And it keeps track of everything. There's no limit like there isn't Photoshopped Photo shop. You're limited by how many history states you said in the preferences. I think by default, it's 25 or 20. But in light room you can see that we've got over over that number of steps here always available to us, and we didn't have to think to dig into the programs preferences to turn on additional history states. Now, lest you be tempted to dig around in photo shots preferences and increase the histories states to something insane like 500. Do not do that because in photo shop, because it is editing your image, the more history states you keep you add the more states of your image that photo shop has to memorize, which means that you need that much more hard drive space for a photo shop. Teoh start cashing those different versions to it's called a scratch disk. So if you had, you know, 100 history states turned on, then you would need a lot more hard drive space for Photoshopped to temporarily store those versions in the history. States only hang around while the documents open, they revert the second you close that document, open it again. Your history panel is empty, empty, empty. That does not happen in light room by room is the most forgiving program. I think for anybody who has who has used I photo for a few years or, you know, even Picasa for PCs, you ready to go to a light room? I mean, it's just amazing forgiving program. You can't mess anything up. You really can't. Okay, so new is add a little bit of our edge vignette back there we go. So let's say this is good. Now let's say I've got a slew of pictures that I need. The exact same changes applied. Teoh, let's come down here to my, uh, photo been down here at the bottom of the screen. That just shows me the other photos that are in that particular collection that were in so I can get at them without having to go back to a library and then bring them into the develop module there. All right, here. Well, if you notice there is a copy and paste button right here, we can copy and paste are changes very, very easily. So if I want to apply the changes to this shot to all of these down here because they were shot under the exact same lighting conditions, it's so easy to do that I can simply make the changes. Click copy light rooms going to say, Hey, you've done a whole lot to this image, which changes exactly, would you like for me to copy? So just think about what all you've done if it's the exact same lighting conditions than definitely keep white balance turned on. But if you've done any cropping to your image, if you've cropped it in a different way than you don't want the crop probably to be on, but you might if you want to also crop the images in the same way you could turn on crop right there. We haven't crop this one. That's why light rooms not automatically checking it. So all of these air turned on you can, uh, check none, and they all go off. And then you could just come in here and turn on which ones you want to apply. Let's say I only wanted to apply my white balance change and perhaps my clarity and perhaps my vibrance to the other images so I could copy just those changes. Or I could copy all of them, turn off my crop just in case I did crop it. I don't remember it. So once you get the check boxes all set up, click copy and then you can come down here to your filmstrip. Select the images that you want to apply the change to see click one and then shift. Click. The last one and light room will select everything in between and then we click paste and they all changed. Pretty amazing, huh? Yes. Copy, Hold. Even if I change collections and go back and forth or does it only hold for that? That collection, whatever you copy stays in your clipboard until you copy something else. So it's not collection based. Its whatever changes you made in the last image that you copy. So they those in those changes stay in my clipboard, I can apply them even if I change collections. Yeah. So now let's take a look at it. Another way to do that. Okay, so let's kind of start over just to repeat. So here's another picture of Uncle George and I can come up here to the basic panel, and I'm gonna go and hide my filmstrip here just for a moment. So the first thing we did was grab the white balance tool and we can come over here in either clicking area that's supposed to be white, gray or black, Or we can try to find a neutral and a neutral is just a pixel were that has similar values and the red, green and blue channels. And you see that down at the bottom of this little panel that appears as soon as you mouse over to your image with the white balance tool active. So I confined a pixel in here. That similar. So this one is 74 70 to 70. That's pretty close. So I'm gonna go ahead and click it, and immediately my color gets a little bit better in this image. I want to make sure that I did. I didn't do undo the other changes. First, someone undo my paste, All right. To get back to the nasty originals. There we go. So now we did our white balance change Looking a little bit better, we might tweak it just a little bit more with the temperature slider. And now we come down here to exposure. But first, we're gonna do what? Turn on our clipping warnings by pressing J. That way we can keep an eye on our highlights. Go too far. They're gonna turn red If we darken our exposure too much and our shadows we're gonna turn blue That lets us know we've pushed them too solid black or white. But I'm gonna brighten him just a little bit kind on here at a little bit of contrast is my scroll bar to go down on the panel. If I need to darken my highlights, I'm gonna grab the highlight slider and drag it to the right. If I need to lighten just my highlights. I'm gonna grab the slider and drag it to the right to reset any of these fighters The default simply double click the text label. Same thing with the shadows. If I want a dark in my shadows a touch I drag it to the left or if I want a lighten it, I could drag to the right. See all that built detail comebacks. Just amazing if I want. If I've got clipping warnings and either the highlights or the shadows, and I can try to dismiss them using these two whites and blacks sliders or you can't option or all to click on the slider itself to reset your white in black points for the white spider, you drag to the right and the first pixels you see come in our your lightest values so you could stop a soon as you see little detail come in. Or if you want to reset your black point you can option or don't click the black slider dragged to the left in the first areas that appear in color or where your darkest pixels live. So you could, you know, fine tune your black point. That way, I'm gonna reset. Those clarity's liken chart Mass is going to increase contrast in the mid tones when you drag it to the right, drag it to the left to soften great for weddings and then to pump up the intensity of colors that are not already highly saturated, dragged the vibrant slider to the right. See, we could drag it pretty much all the way to the right, and it wouldn't tear our image completely apart. Not that we would do that, but if we drag saturation all the way, the right we haven't unusable image. Yeah, it gets real scary, so I usually stay away from saturation completely. But I tend to pump up the vibrance a little bit, except for when I shoot in Hawaii. And then I have to decrease the vibrance because all of the colors or so intense anyway, and then once we've done that, we can come down here. Let's say to the effects panel and the amount slider right here lets you create a soft edge. Been yet so we can drag to the left for a slightly darkened edge that you confine team with the sliders. Or we can drag to the right for a lighter edge. So let's drag it this a little bit to the left. Let's say that's good. Now let's view our photos in our film strip. If we want to copy these changes to another image, we could simply press copy, adjust, which changes we actually want copy to our clipboard that we can then apply these air. Feinstein was gonna go ahead and click, Cancel, and then we could select the next photo or multiple photos using your your film strip down here and we can click paste. And now those changes were applied to that image. I can undo those changes by pressing Commander Control Z. We'll show you one more way to change the image, so I'm gonna go ahead and click to select the image in the filmstrip here that I did those corrections on. Now I'm in a shift. Click the last photo in that city. If I click the Sync button over here at the bottom right of the panel. In the develop module, I get that same check box situation where light one is confirming What exactly do I want? A copy paste, but it saves me one step. So instead of copying the settings and then pasting them, this lets me synchronize them across multiple photos so I could just click, synchronize. And now all of those photos change So it will take a second, you know, for light room to make all those changes. But you can see down here in my filmstrip now they all look like the photo that I selected. So the key to using synchronize is just to make sure that the photo that you made the changes to is also selected. And then when you select the other photos you'll see, I'll zoom in a little bit. You can see the little green outline. That's the photo that light room is taking the settings from and applying to the other ones that kind of get you all excited about light room. It's really it's such timesaver, such a time saver. Any questions on that segment? Yes, I'm two questions that is sort of similar when you're in the color correcting like the very first part instead of, um, so the top in his department's got the triangles. Yes. What's the difference between clicking that and making your adjustments versus hitting? J. Okay, these triangles, unlike the triangles that you might see in Photoshopped, these air just your shadow and highlight clipping warnings. So that's all these triangles do. They're not. I mean, you could click and drag in the history, Graham, but that's them a little bit beyond the scope of this class. Better to use the sliders like we talked about. But I think what you're thinking about is that when you do like a levels adjustment and Photoshopped, these fighters appear underneath the hissed a gram, and you can move them that what you're talking about. But when you What do they do in this particular case? Do they light up or change when you're using command Jr. I recommend you were just hitting J of the detained. Anything in those or can you turn one off on one on? Or is it just you can you can turn them on individually by clicking so depressing J just turns them both OK, Yeah. So they're just warnings is really all they are. And when they've got a white border around them, that means that that warning is on. But yeah, that's a great point that you can click. Let's say if I'm on Lee really concerned about clipping in my highlights, I might just click the highlight warning and keep it on and not mess with the shadow. Morning, you know, But I typically do. I type about 120 words a minute, so I do everything in keyboard shortcuts. Eso I can't. I tend to just turn them off and on concurrently, but on their next part to it was, there is the auto button there. Do you ever use just the auto button? I don't look in the basic panel you could. So Light Room is happy to do an auto adjustment. That's basically saying, hey, hi, dreams to do whatever you think this picture needs, so you can certainly, uh, click that, but I tend not to. I tend to really start by doing my manual white balance and then working my way down the sliders, which is, if you're if you're in a hurry, you know try doing auto button, but I find in my own tests that it doesn't really ever get me where I want to be. Oh, but try it.

Class Description

Adobe Creative Cloud is an essential toolkit for photographers — but navigating its many programs can be overwhelming. Join best-selling author Lesa Snider for a comprehensive course on how to harness the power of Creative Cloud to build a thriving photography business.

Lesa will show you how to grow your photography business with Creative Cloud’s suite of applications. You’ll learn how to build promotional materials, how to create and customize a professional-grade portfolio website with Behance, add compelling elements like slideshows, audio, and video, and display your portfolio on any mobile device — even in printed book form. You’ll also learn how to use Photoshop to create a professional and engaging video portfolio to showcase on your website, iPad, Behance, or burn onto DVD.

Lesa will also cover how to use Kuler to grab a color palette from a favorite image for use on your website or promotional materials, as well as how to use familiar drag-and-drop tools in Adobe Muse. By the end of this course, you will be able to create a full-blown website worthy of your work, with light boxes and slideshows to showcase your portfolio, and contact forms to gather leads.


Software Used: Adobe Creative Cloud 2014 

Reviews

Jan Pittard Photo
 

I have watched the day one and part of the day two classes -- this class is chock full of creative ways to use the cloud to expand your business -- and to help photographers help their clients get more for their money as well as save money in creating beautiful marketing tools. I had been so confused over the lightroom/photoshop thing, and Lesa makes it so easy to understand how to use each program for their strengths or super powers -- so I'm ready to power up my photography business !

Michelle B
 

Lesa makes learning easy! Thank you Lesa!